COVID-19

Get the Facts from Doctors and Medical Professionals

 WHAT IS COVID-19? 

Coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases. Coronavirus disease, also known as COVID-19, is a new strain discovered in 2019 that had not been previously identified in humans.

 

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a pandemic, and the United States has declared a national emergency in response to the virus.

 

Doctors across the country are closely monitoring developments to ensure they are keeping patients safe and informed with the most up-to-date information.

 WHAT ARE DOCTORS DOING ABOUT COVID-19? 

During this health crisis, doctors continue to do what is best for their patients. One doctor in Atlanta has made the difficult decision to live away from his wife and three children to lower their risk of exposure. A nurse in New York sent her daughters to live with their grandparents so she could continue caring for patients without worrying about exposing her family. Thousands more are making sacrifices. Doctors across the country have accepted the risks to their own health and continue to put patients first every day.

 WHAT SHOULD I DO: 

  • Practice good hygiene. Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, avoid touching your face, sneeze or cough into a tissue or the inside of your elbow, and disinfect commonly-used items and surfaces as much as possible.

  • Avoid social gatherings of more than ten people.

  • Work or engage in school from home whenever possible.

  • Avoid eating or drinking at restaurants, bars, and food courts.

  • Avoid discretionary travel, shopping trips, and social visits.

Federal, state and local governments encourage you to:

 WHAT ELSE SHOULD PATIENTS KNOW: 

1.

Hospitals expect to see significant increases in patient volume over the next few weeks

2.

Testing for COVID-19 is limited, but expansion efforts are underway

3.

Vaccines are not currently available

4.

Treatment recommendations are limited to supportive care measures